Thursday, June 7, 2012

Wet, wetter, wettest

It's Rose Festival time in Portland. That invariably means rain, and often lots of it. I've been doing a few garden things between showers, but today we are having solid, drenching rain. And I'm a fair-weather gardener, so I prefer to stay dry if I can. Hence today's post on my wet garden (okay, I did briefly venture out to soak the camera.)

It's wet. As usual, the Northwest Territory looks terrific in the rain.



Even the mulch under the dense cedars is staying wet.

Water is pooling on the patio table.
 
The Mountain Hemlock's response to the continued moisture is to fluff out nicely. If we have a bad tomato year, this tree stays happy. It's solace of a sort.


More natives bask in the liquid sunshine.


The effect of all this rain is a lush and verdant green on many of Longview Ranch's residents.


Although it looks like I need to improve the drainage here....


There's a little more color variation here, and it's wet...


...wetter

 ...wettest?  Let's just say the Agave family and their friends are beginning to wonder if they should be packing for a move to the Southwest.

 How are you and your garden coping with Northwest rain? 



25 comments:

  1. Oh the rain! I am using this time to catch up with all of the tasks I've put off indoors. Maybe I'll get around to some laundry and vacuuming today.

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    1. Somehow, I find it even harder to do those chores when it's raining. I spend my time looking longingly out the windows, instead...

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  2. Jane, what is the center shrub in IMG_7698.JPG? Everything looks so lovely. I officially want to add a mountain hemlock to my yard!

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    1. Heather, it's Syphoricarpus or Snowberry, a lovely native. The mountain hemlock IS special - if you can, locate it somewhere it doesn't cook in summer and it will be much happier.

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    2. Oops, that's Symphoricarpus (albus, actually)! Dang typos.

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  3. The rain is insane up this way too! You are right about the crazy verdant greens though. It looks like you such a fantastic mix of plants (in my humble opinion). Its really nice to see that large trachycarpus back there too! They look so wonderful right in the mix with so many plant combinations. And that agave collection.... LOVE!

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    1. Thanks, Louis! The Trachy is really coming into its own this year, and we love it.

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  4. Michelle on CastleJune 7, 2012 at 12:06 PM

    Why does your garden look so beautiful while mine looks just...drowned. I guess because you know what you are doing!
    I know where there's a little pile of sand & fine gravel going free.. if you're serious about that drainage. :)

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    1. Oh, I think you and Pete know what you're doing alright. I'll really be serious about the drainage when we replace the grass with paths, though I have existing piles of gravel and pumice to deplete meanwhile. But thanks for the thought!

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  5. I'm in Tucson right now where agaves (and many others) are shrinking for lack of rain - I'm sure yours are happier!!

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    1. Well, I don't know...happier is debatable. But did you enjoy the bigger views of the garden? I thought of your prior request when I was shooting them.

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    2. I did! And thanks so much...love seeing green!!

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  6. Well, so far so good. You're right in that it would seem weird to not have rain right now, during Rose Festival. I'm kind of happy for the rain since it means things will stay green a little longer after the rain quits for two months.

    Your back garden looks absolutely fabulous. I love the rocks and moss, nary a weed to be seen. You've been working hard and it shows!

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    1. I think the lack of overall coverage is the main reason there are few weeds: they're too easy to spot. We need more plant cover, especially in the Northwest Territory.

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  7. Looks great, I love these wider views of the garden. I'm wondering what that plant with the big leaves is, next to the bamboo, in the puddle photo? And that very tall grass, which I think is next to the Trachycarpus? I have a similar puddle in my garden when it rains heavily, I just put lots of plants that like wet feet there.

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    1. Alison, that's Tetrapanax papyrifer 'Steroidal Giant' next to the bamboo, and the tall grass is Cortaderia selloana, or Pampas Grass.

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  8. The dogs and I make quick trips out ,than back in for window viewing .
    The Northwest territory is looking great, all those lovely mossy mounds and big pebbles!

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    1. Must be even harder with pooches that need to go out regularly, Linda.

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  9. So next week, when the Rose Fest is over....that means we get sun right? Everything (except maybe the Agaves) does look like it's loving the state of things, rain and all, and we the lucky ones to have the rain...right?

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    1. Oh yes, Loree, nothing but sun from next week on!

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  10. Just came from basking in the sunshine at Lost in the Landscape, but your post reminds me that I wouldn't trade our wonderful wetness for anything. Well...maybe a time or two for brief periods.

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    1. We need to do a warm location field trip, Ricki. Are you game?

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  11. Of course, after I published that post, the day cleared up considerably. But it rained the next day!

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  12. I so envy the shiny cleanliness of your rainy garden, every single rain-scrubbed leaf. And the agaves look like they're coping just fine.

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    1. I'd trade for your coastal foggy warmth in a heartbeat, Denise. I've been contemplating a house trade...how about a garden trade?

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