Saturday, September 15, 2012

Bloom Day, September 2012

It's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, and here in Portland, the September flowers are acting like summer will never end. Although I have quite a few plants blooming this month, here's a look at my very favorite ones:

Caryopteris is a late-summmer bloomer with a hue reminiscent of one of my favorite garden plants,  Ceanothus. The bees like it as much as they like Ceanothus, too.
This is only part of the original plant. A couple of years ago I accidentally shoveled it apart when it was dormant, but I stuck the broken off piece in the soil and it came back the next year. Now I have two plants.

Speaking of Ceanothus, C. 'Victoria" is showing a few blossoms this month, too. That may be the result of the small pruning it got following its spring bloom.
Also in blue this month, the indefatigable Fine-toothed Penstemon (Penstemon subserratus).

This pretty NW native has been blooming off and on since May. The Mulchman is enjoying the color in his Northwest Territory, so I've been sprinkling its seeds around in hopes of volunteers next year.

Another long-blooming plant is Agastache 'Acapulco Orange'. Its color seems pinker now at the end of summer, but it's been performing since June with absolutely no supplemental water. I love this plant!

An encore performer is Phygelius x rectus 'Passionate'. I cut the spent bloom spikes off a month ago, and it came back with quite a few more. I'm glad, because the hummingbirds seem to particularly like its narrow orange tubes.

Kniphofia porphyrantha is giving us one welcome (but probably last) bloom.

Our Crape Myrtle tree is in full flower. I don't know what cultivar it is, but from the color I'm guessing 'Catawba'.

In more Crape Myrtle news, the much younger Lagerstroemia 'Natchez' has two bloom heads this year! I planted this cultivar for its reputedly striking bark, but the flowers are a fun addition this time of year.

Trachelospermum jasminoides 'Confederate Cream' is still going strong.

This long-lived single bloom on the Acanthus spinosa has sprouted a little topknot of leaves. Since it's new this year I have no idea whether this development is typical or a little strange.

Common Snowberry (Symphoricarpus albus) is flowering, berrying and feeding bees.

Finally, though most of the Crocosmia are finished, 'Golden Fleece' (also known as 'Citron') still has flowers for September.

For more of what's blooming out there in the world this month, visit our host Carol, at May Dreams Gardens. Happy Bloom Day!


21 comments:

  1. I saw a very nice Lagerstroemia 'Natchez' in the garden at South Waterfront Park last week, you're gonna love the bark on that one! Although those flowers are pretty spectacular too.

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    1. I'll see if I can find that 'Natchez' Loree - thanks for the tip!

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  2. Crape myrtles are so bright, I'm tempted to buy one. But I can't buy one of everything! Love Caryopteris too, how lucky that when you accidentally split it, both halves lived. I have a Ceanothus that I planted this spring that also has a couple of extra flowers on it.

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    1. One of the things I most like about Crape Myrtles, Alison, is their graceful vase-like shape. But other plusses are lovely bark, and pretty late summer flowers. I'm sure you could squeeze one or two in!

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  3. Simply amazing, Jane!!! I love the Agastache 'Acapulco Orange.' That is amazing that it doesn't take any supplemental water. I have been thinking about planting some agastache Do you think they would settle in before the wet? I know they like dry feet so I will probably wait till next spring just to be safe. But I just love the orange/pink they provide as well as the textural contrast.

    I too have noticed ceanothus around town with the odd bloom here and there.

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    1. With Agastache, I'd wait until next spring, Louis. They don't like the wet and I lost my first 'Acapulco Orange' after two years from winter (and clay soil, I suspect.)

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  4. So many fabulous plants! Really enjoyed your photos!!

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  5. Aren't Agastaches amazing...I just don't know how they can look so good with so little care! I keep thinking perhaps I should add a Penstemon...maybe I'll find a spot for one this fall :-)

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    1. Penstemon is a natural (no pun intended) for your plantings, Scott. You might look for a taller one that this, if you want it to be seen over your billowy grasses, etc. ;-)

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  6. I'm thinking I need to try that phygelius. Wonderful Bloom Day post, Jane.

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    1. Denise, 'Passionate' is foolproof, and so lovely with its dark reddish-purple foliage. I'm less smitten with the ones I see that have green foliage and lighter orange flowers, but in the right setting...

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  7. Re. the Acanthus: definitely a little strange. I have had them for years and never seen one do that. Pam featured Caryopterus for GBBD too, and I was wondering if it would do well here. Now I know.

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  8. Caryopteris is new to me--love it! And I love your yellow crocosmia.

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    1. I think it's a good year for the Caryopteris. I've seen lots around this month.

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  9. I have a few blooms on my Ceanothus too and I didn't prune mine. I think it's got to do with daylight hours.

    I wish I could get an Agastache to look like yours! What an amazing plant. And with the Phygelius, gorgeous!

    Someday I'd like to get my Acanthus to bloom too but I doubt it ever will since it's in shade and never seems to be happy with the (lack of) water I give it. :)

    Great post! It's definitely still summer.

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    1. I feel very lucky with mu Agastache, Grace. We'll see what follows next year as it could be pretty short lived. That won't stop me trying again though!

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  11. I like the look of that Caryopteris,I'll be looking out for it.
    I'm like Grace no luck with the Agastache , is it ag-ah-STACK-ee or ag-ah-stash ???

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    1. Linda, I think it's usually pronounced ag-ah-STACK-ee, but for years I pronounced it ag-ah-stash so I'm no authority.

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