Monday, December 15, 2014

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December 2014

Like the days as we draw near to the Solstice, this Bloom Day post will be short - there are very few flowers in my garden this month, and just a few indoor blooms.

Flowers in the garden include a blooming stem of prostrate Rosemary that stands out on the otherwise green plant.

Camellia sasanqua 'Yuletide' carries the month!



Mahonia nervosa repens is getting ready to bloom - will it be open for January's Bloom Day?


Arctostaphylos 'Austin Griffiths' is also moving toward its bloom phase, but not yet opening.

Indoors, Cyperus involucrata 'Baby Tut' appears to be thriving, if its fluffy, pollen-filled blooms are any indication. Maybe they're the reason I've been sneezing all day. I know most people up here grow Papyrus as an annual, but I just couldn't let it this happy plant die outdoors over winter.

A NOID Streptocarpus (Streptocarpella saxorum, thank you, Rickii) is a reliable bloomer, often for months at a time.

Last, Clivia miniata 'Belgian Hybrid Orange' steals the show indoors.

Despite the paucity of December flowers in my garden, I am ever grateful to Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting Bloom Day each month. Click over there to enjoy many more flowers from all over the world.

Happy Bloom Day!

17 comments:

  1. Oh, that camellia! What a dreamy color.

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    1. It's not a color I love with others, but this time of year it has no competition - or comparison!

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  2. I see... you have a Streptocarpella , thanks to Rickii, I now know what it is ! How do you look after yours, mine is in my sunroom , which is not very sunny or warm in the winter. S. doesn't seem to mind , still blooming away.

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    1. Linda, it lives in a south-facing window all year, with deciduous trees for shade in summer, and some sun in winter. It's a warm room, though. iI yours is blooming, I'd say you're doing fine!

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    2. And I'm indebted to Rickii, for the correction on the name. Apparently ours are both Streptocarpella saxorum. Thanks, Rickii!

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  3. Oh! Clivia blossoms already? Hooray! Your Camellia 'Yuletide' is gorgeous. I keep killing them so have decided to admire them in other gardens. (C. japonicas LOVE it in my garden but C. sasanquas complain)

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    1. Please feel free to admire away - we do!

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  4. Hmm...I should check my 'Austin Griffiths' and see if it has any buds. Your Camellia is beautiful!

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    1. Bet your 'Austin' has buds, but they do seem to take months to actually bloom from this stage. Maybe we'll see them by February's Bloom Day.

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  5. Ah, Jane, you are such a wordsmith. Who else would think to equate the shortness of a post with the shorter days of winter?

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    1. Actually, it's because I am focused on the coming days of light, Rickii.

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  6. Outdoors we have snow, no blooms.

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    1. You are the real gardeners in Zone 5, Kathy. We in the maritime PNW are so spoiled.

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  7. I love your blooms, both indoors and out. I am really thinking I need to get a 'Yuletide' Camellia. I had one years ago but it didn't make for some reason, likely human error. Yours is very inspiring. Just gorgeous!

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    1. Interestingly, there are three 'Yuletide' in that location (destined to create some privacy), but only the one I show is blooming.

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  8. The Papyrus was a good reminder for me that some plants in the Cyperus genus are actually considered desirable. I tend to forget that, dealing only with the weedy ones.

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  9. I think I need a Yuletide Camellia, too. All your blooms are lovely.

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