Sunday, March 15, 2020

Flowers in the time of Coronavirus, or Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - March 2020

What a weird two weeks it has been. Sad and sober reports of increasing infections and deaths, lack of leadership on a national level, panicked clearing of grocery shelves, and cancellations of events both big and small have helped me appreciate what a solace my garden can be when the world becomes unpredictable.

I'm soothed by the way the irrepressible pink flowers of Ribes sanguineum seem to say, "Life will go on."
Serious pinky goodness in Loropetalum chinensis 'Sizzling Pink' reinforces that message.

The whole shrub is an extra-large helping of pink optimism. It's an example I need.

More pink perfection in this impeccable bloom on Camellia 'April Kiss'.
Not to be outdone, Mahonia aquifolium, our native mahonia, is bursting forth with ebullient yellow flowers.
A young Acacia pravissima, whose buds I showed last month. has opened its fabulous little puffball flowers for us this month; don't worry, be happy!



No Epimedium in my garden has a name, as they each came unidentified in plant swaps from generous gardening friends. What a nice reminder of the special thread that runs between us all.


Daphne 'Eternal Fragrance' reminds that steadfastness is a strength to be valued in these days of uncertainty.

The little white flowers of Beesia deltophylla look great against its coppery foliage.
Camellia transnokoensis is a challenge to photograph. It's an odd shrub that I really haven't given enough room in my garden, but I like seeing its small, simple white flowers in spring.



Osmanthus x burkwoodii is a mass of bloom this month. After three years in the garden, it is outgrowing the severe shape it was pruned into and is finally opening up to its natural form; slow and steady, that will get us through.

Carol, of May Dreams Gardens, hosts Bloom Day in the middle of each month. Hop on over there to see what's happening in gardens all over today.

Happy Bloom Day, all - stay safe, and let your garden do the heavy lifting for awhile.


9 comments:

  1. Isn't it comforting to know that nature never disappoints? Stay healthy!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amen to that! What a privilege and mental stabilizer a garden is... It's a lifesaver! It's been such a weird week, and I've realized that many of my favorite things are quite solitary - which these days is a good thing. Stay safe, Jane!

    ReplyDelete
  3. "extra-large helping of pink optimism"....ha! Thanks Jane, I loved that.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm totally with you. Being outdoors, harvesting vegetables -- I sure hope my mountain city won't go on lock down, but we're prepared.

    It was a lovely distraction to sort through my old seeds this afternoon, prompted by a potential summer renter from your part of the world, back East to help her mom.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm with you Jane ... gardening is a very virus-safe activity . My company has asked us to work from home, and so I can be in my garden every day.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Aaah, a breath of fresh air. Thank you Jane and thank you gardens for showing us that beauty still exists.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It warmed my heart to see several bee species on my Osmanthus today. It's spring in the garden. What a sweet and marvelous diversion from the current state of affairs. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  8. This whole craziness has put me in mind of Gabriel Garcia Marquez also. So much color in your garden in March! Things here are mostly brown.

    ReplyDelete
  9. "Slow and steady..." I'm with you, Jane. Thanks for that tour and your words. Glad to know you are there, and feeling the same as me.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you in advance for jumping through the annoying but necessary word verification hoop to leave your thoughts!