Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day - May 2017

It's the day after Bloom Day so I'm late again. Luckily, that lets me share just a couple more flowers in my garden than I had two days ago when I began photographing.

So here are my May blooms, beginning with all the white flowers and the excitement of my very first Eucalyptus flowers on E. pauciflora ssp debeuzevilli.
Saxifraga cotyledon 'Caterhamensis'. This one is grown for its tight bun of foliage, so the flower stalk is a spring bonus.

Other succulents are sending up sprays of blossoms, making this a very frothy bed indeed.
Speaking of frothy, here's Fothergilla gardenii 'Mt Airy'.

The papery little flowers of Luzula nivea.
Cistus obtusifolius.

Cornus 'Eddie's White Wonder'.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Leprechaun's Gold' and A. vulgaris 'Icy Blue' lead us into another color.

Camassia quamash.



I can't get enough of these lovely native bulbs.
Here's a closeup of Great Camas, Camassia lechtlinii.

Iris tenax.

Difficult to photograph, but lovely in the sunny garden, Lewisia cotyledon var. howelli.

Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum 'Sizzling Pink' is very oddly shaped after snow damage, but it's blooming happily.

Physocarpus opulifolius 'Summer Wine' is just beginning to flower.
Both the Trachycarpus fortunei are blooming their odd, prehistoric-looking flowers.

I guess I have two of the same sex because I didn't get any berries last year.

Cytisus sessilifolius hardly bloomed last year. This year it has lots of little yellow flowers.
Berberis verruculosa. See those long thorns? It's flowery, but it's mean.

A pretty orange poppy.
Various Lewisia cotyledon 'Sunset Series'.
Helianthemum 'Henfield Brilliant'. The plus side of losing our huge Ceanothus is more blooms on many of the sun-loving species.
Primula veris 'Sunset Shades'.

Halmiocistus wintonensis 'Merrist Woods Cream'.

Bloom Day is hosted by Carol, at May Dreams Gardens, where you can see flowers from all over the globe.

Happy belated Bloom Day!


14 comments:

  1. Oh I love Euc flowers. I think they are my favorite from your post today, with the white Aquilegia a close second.

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    1. After about nine years, I'm so excited about those Euc blooms!

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  2. Eucalyptus flowers ! I've never seem one , that is exciting . I had to cut mine down to the ground , it looked so DEAD ., but I just found some tiny new growth ….I'll take it !

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    1. It's a Euc, Linda. It will return!

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  3. Great blooms! I have Eucalyptus pauciflora ssp. niphophila. I planted it almost two years ago and it hasn't grown much. Hoping this year it will start to take off. I love Iris tenax. It's everywhere here.

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    1. Mine grew quickly, but it had probably too much TLC in the beginning. Now I just ignore it :-)

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  4. The Camassia and Helianthemum - gorgeous!

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    1. I know how you like an orange flower!

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  5. I find the odd shape of your Loropetalum charming. The blooms of Mt Airy look so fine against the foliage. The ones we have at JC are blooming on bare stems, no foliage yet. I wonder what that's about. Blooming Eucalyptus! That seems like cause for celebration.

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  6. Woohoo..do you have some serious blooms in your garden. I am excited about the eucalyptus blooms..so exotic! You started my love of lewisia..so nice to see your patch creating a cloud of color. Happy GBBD!

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  7. What a beautiful garden. You have some of my favorites, dogwood, yellow poppies, and fothergilla. That white columbine is a beauty!

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  8. So sorry you lost your Ceanothus, but those Helianthemums are a nice comfort, I imagine! Cool with Euca flowers! I'm just astounded that the "non-hardy" Euca I bought as an annual three years ago sailed through this winter. No flowers, though, but still odd... I hadn't counted on that, even though I put it on the lee side of the house. Still - I'll take it! :)

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  9. Beautiful blooms! How many Helianthemum did you plant in that area? I am wondering how far they spread.

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    1. That's one plant, Phillip. They happily spread to 4 ft in a few years.

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